For what does the speaker blame herself?How does she resolve this? What does she mean when she says “All’s Vanity”? What two homes does she describe? Who does she imply is the owner of both...

For what does the speaker blame herself?

How does she resolve this?

What does she mean when she says “All’s Vanity”?

What two homes does she describe?

Who does she imply is the owner of both homes?

 

Asked on by jmac1992

3 Answers

Top Answer

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In this poem, Anne Bradstreet is giving her readers a very religious message -- she is telling us that what we have on Earth is not important.  All of the stuff we think is important on Earth is just vanity.

That is why she is blaming herself, as you put it.  She is criticizing herself for feeling bad about the house burning down.  She is saying that she should not care about this stuff because her treasure is in Heaven.  That's how I'd say she resolves her issues -- by realizing that this life is not what is important.

In keeping with these themes, she is saying that both houses actually belong to God.