What does Simon's death symbolize?

In Lord of the Flies, Simon's death symbolizes the death of hope and innocence and is often compared to the death of Christ.

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Simon is often interpreted as representing a Christlike character, and that sense of goodness is essential in understanding what his death symbolizes. Simon removes himself from the arguments of the group, instead focusing on service and peace. When the littluns need help reaching fruit, it is Simon who places himself...

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Simon is often interpreted as representing a Christlike character, and that sense of goodness is essential in understanding what his death symbolizes. Simon removes himself from the arguments of the group, instead focusing on service and peace. When the littluns need help reaching fruit, it is Simon who places himself among the children to assist them. Instead of aligning himself with Jack's party, who eagerly seek death and blood, Simon retreats to a private space for solitude. He seems to have insight into the true nature of mankind, telling the boys that perhaps the "beast" they seek cannot be found on the island but instead resides within each of them.

Simon is ridiculed by the group, with even Piggy, who symbolizes reason, calling him "cracked." After battling with the Lord of the Flies, symbolizing evil, Simon stumbles out of the forest, and the group immediately rushes upon him, killing the most blameless boy in the group.

Simon's death is similar to the death of Christ in the New Testament. When Pilate asked the crowd what should happen to Christ, they shouted for Pilate to crucify Christ, who was sinless. When Simon emerges from the forest, even Piggy and Ralph participate in his death from the outer edges of the group. No one makes an effort to save Simon; no one makes a stand for goodness.

This symbolizes the death of hope and innocence. From this point forward, the boys spiral into a descending mania of bloodthirsty murder, seeking to kill first Piggy and then Ralph. They have lost all sense of civilization and nearly destroy the entire island in their narrow focus on violence and hate.

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