What does the second stanza of "The Good Morrow" by John Donne mean?  

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Let us just remind ourselves of the context of this excellent poem. The speaker is a man who is addressing a woman with whom he has spent the night. As they wake up and lie in bed together, he talks to her, describing the love that they have.

The title...

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Let us just remind ourselves of the context of this excellent poem. The speaker is a man who is addressing a woman with whom he has spent the night. As they wake up and lie in bed together, he talks to her, describing the love that they have.

The title of the poem comes from the second stanza, as the first stanza argues that they were not really born before this point because of their lack of knowledge of love. Now however, their union has caused their souls to "wake," so the speaker bids "good morrow" to them. They have awakened to a love that is trusting and not dominated by fear. Jealousy has no part in their relationship as the purity of their love means they are not looking for other lovers:

For love all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.

Their love is so complete that even the little room they are in becomes an "everywhere."

The stanza continues by considering the outer world that the lovers have given up to be together. The physical worlds that explorers seek and the spiritual world of the lovers is contrasted, and the speaker affirms that each of the lovers is a world in themselves, but at the same time arguing that they should "possess one world" through their union together. This refers to the Elizabethan belief that every human was their own miniature universe.

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