What does school look like in the refugee camp for Salve in A Long Walk to Water?

In A Long Walk to Water, Salve Dut undergoes several informal types of schooling during his experience in refugee camps. First, Salve attends school in a tent in a refugee camp in Ethiopia (with no books or writing materials). Salve's next educational venture is undertaken at a refugee camp in Kenya, where an Irish aid worker named Michael teaches Salve English.

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The protagonist of Linda Sue Park's A Long Walk to Water is Salve Dut, a member of the Dinka tribe (one of several tribes native to Sudan). A liberation movement arose to protest lack of autonomy for South Sudan, resulting in the Second Sudanese Civil War. This civil strife...

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The protagonist of Linda Sue Park's A Long Walk to Water is Salve Dut, a member of the Dinka tribe (one of several tribes native to Sudan). A liberation movement arose to protest lack of autonomy for South Sudan, resulting in the Second Sudanese Civil War. This civil strife resulted in millions of both casualties and refugees. Salve and many other refugees end up staying in refugee camps for extended periods of time before eventually traveling to the US to live with an adoptive family.

The first refugee camp that Salve visits is in Ethiopia. Here, to allay his boredom, Salve attends school in a tent. There are no books or writing utensil, but there are adults willing to give lessons. Salve is inspired to attend school by the memory of his father. It is while Salve was in school that trucks of soldiers arrived and forced Salve and his company to leave Ethiopia.

During Salve's stay at his final refugee camp in Kenya, Salve continues his informal schooling when he meets an aid worker named Michael, who is Irish and speaks with an accent. Michael offers to teach Salve English, and the two also play volleyball together. Eventually, Salve, alongside a few other so-called "lost boys of Sudan," are sent to the US. Salve is adopted by a family from Rochester, New York, where he continues his education and eventually becomes an activist at his school in the US.

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