What does Satan do to Job in the Book of Job?

In the Book of Job in the Bible, Satan inflicts numerous torments on Job to test his faith in God. The actions that Satan takes against Job result in his animals dying or getting stolen, his children dying, his wife rejecting him, and sores breaking out on his body.

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In the Book of Job in the Old Testament of the Bible, Satan—which means adversary—challenges God during a celestial court meeting. He maintains that Job, a happy, successful, pious man, would lose faith in God if he experienced multiple calamities. God agrees to a test of this idea, in which...

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In the Book of Job in the Old Testament of the Bible, Satan—which means adversary—challenges God during a celestial court meeting. He maintains that Job, a happy, successful, pious man, would lose faith in God if he experienced multiple calamities. God agrees to a test of this idea, in which Satan will cause numerous devastating incidents.

The first set of catastrophes occur in one day, beginning with Job’s animals. Thieves make off with some of them, while others perish in a fire. The human caretakers also die. Without the animals, Job has almost no source of livelihood and is left a poor man.

Satan also causes the death of Job’s ten children, who perish when a tremendous gale blows away their house. Although his wife survives, she is devastated.

The apparent bad luck, which was instigated by Satan, becomes the subject of much discussion with Job’s friends as well. His friends doubt his behavior, assuming that he did something to incur the wrath of God. As Job has not given in, God allows Satan to test him further.

Satan then causes a mysterious illness, in which sores or boils break out all over Job’s body. His wife, who thinks he should curse God, leaves him.

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