What does Reverend Hale want John to do with his information in act 2?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

In act 2, Reverend Hale visits John Proctor's home to investigate some of the accusations, and Elizabeth begs her husband to share the vital information with Hale. John Proctor then informs Reverend Hale that he knows for sure that the girls' sickness has nothing to do with witchcraft and they...

See
This Answer Now

Start your subscription to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your Subscription

In act 2, Reverend Hale visits John Proctor's home to investigate some of the accusations, and Elizabeth begs her husband to share the vital information with Hale. John Proctor then informs Reverend Hale that he knows for sure that the girls' sickness has nothing to do with witchcraft and they were just startled when Reverend Parris caught them "sportin' in the woods." He also tells Reverend Hale that he received the information directly from Abigail Williams, who is currently the leading court official.

Reverend Hale is astonished by Proctor's testimony and encourages him to reveal the information in front of Salem's court. John Proctor responds by telling Reverend Hale that he will address the court if it is necessary but has many doubts. Proctor acknowledges the fact that the court may dismiss his testimony and he is extremely wary that the witchcraft hysteria has corrupted the minds of Salem's authority figures. Reverend Hale is rather naive and has yet to witness the authoritative, callous nature of Deputy Governor Danforth and Judge Hathorne when someone challenges their court.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Reverend Hale, while not convinced of Abigails innocence or John's story, wants John to come forward. Hale is naive, and believes that an open and frank discussion in the court will reveal all truths, and solve all problems. He has not yet come to understand the corruption the court is working under, trusting too much in his academics and the "credentials" of those with whom he is working.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team