In Fahrenheit 451, what does Ray Bradbury think society and its individuals must do to prevent the destruction of the species?  

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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Some critics of Ray Bradbury's texts have associated him with Naturalism. If one were to examine Fahrenheit 451 from a Naturalistic point-of-view, the answer to the question, "what does Ray Bradbury think society and its individuals must do to prevent the destruction of the species," would be a resounding, "nothing."

According to the Naturalists, man was far weaker than nature. Nature, for this group, felt that nature would, inevitably, overcome mankind in every scenario. Therefore, nothing that mankind could do would be able to "overpower" nature. While this leaves a "bad taste" in the mouth of most humans, Naturalists simply admitted that they were not the most powerful "beings" on earth.

Given that the novel depicts a Dystopian society and mankind's dehumanization, one could justify that nature was far more powerful than those in power. This can be justified by Bradbury's imagery regarding nature and the power nature has over the characters in the novel (for example, Montag's change of heart about life in the country).

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