What does Ralph notice about his hygiene and why is it wrong for Jack to kill the largest sow?

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In chapter 7 Ralph thinks about how he could clean himself up.  He'd bathe for starters, cut his hair, brush his teeth and after looking at his bitten-to-the-quick nails, realizes he couldn't fix those.

In chapter 8 the boys kill the sow.  The reason this is such a horrible scene...

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In chapter 7 Ralph thinks about how he could clean himself up.  He'd bathe for starters, cut his hair, brush his teeth and after looking at his bitten-to-the-quick nails, realizes he couldn't fix those.

In chapter 8 the boys kill the sow.  The reason this is such a horrible scene is because the pig is a mother, nursing her young.  It should be respected as a very tender and beautiful thing.  She is "sunk in deep maternal bliss."  Then the boys are described as "wedded to her in lust" as they attack her.  All of the descriptions of the boys stabbing her very closely describes a gang-rape scene.  They even shove the spear up her back end and make jokes about it.  This scene is where the boys officially "lose their innocence."

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