What does Ralph consider their primary objective in "Lord of the Flies"?

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The boys' primary objective is staying alive, and then of course being found. Ralph is particularly attentive to the fact that the fire is important -  not just to meet their own needs but to attract the attention of a ship eventually passing by. Ralph acknowledges the boys' helplessness...

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The boys' primary objective is staying alive, and then of course being found. Ralph is particularly attentive to the fact that the fire is important -  not just to meet their own needs but to attract the attention of a ship eventually passing by. Ralph acknowledges the boys' helplessness in the long run without help from the world outside. At the end of the story it is indeed the forest fire that catches the captain's attention, thus bringing his ship ashore.

The survival instinct brings to the fore both community spirit and savagery. This idea is presented in an antithetical way, as the boys either gravitate to Piggy and Ralph's group or to Jack's. When the ship finally does rescue the boys, for some it is unfortunately too late.

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