What does the protagonist compare multiculturalism to? What language technique is used to make this comparison? (Story in the description)  My emancipation didnt happen like I expected it to. I...

What does the protagonist compare multiculturalism to? What language technique is used to make this comparison? (Story in the description)

 

My emancipation didnt happen like I expected it to.

I thought maybe Id wake up one morning and see the light. Feel liberated from everything. Or maybe one particular incident would see me through it. But it happened while I was hysterically crying again.

It was after receiving a birthday card from Jacob which I threw in the bin. I just say there thinking back on the year and I realised that I was emancipated long ago. It wasn’t at one particular point either, it was several. The hang-ups I once had were superseded, but not with other hangups as much as with a few sorrows.

I remembered feeling socially out of it at St Marthas, yet when the fiasco of the walkathon happened, I realised I wasnt. I thought my birth circumstances were a cross I’d bear for the rest of my life, but what had happened between Nonna and Marcus Standford made me realise that it had never been my cross. I had only made it mine.

And the different cultures thing?

Well, Im not sure whether everyone in this country will ever understand multiculturalism and that saddens me because it’s as much part of Australian life as football and meat-pies. But the important thing is that I know where my place in life is. It’s not where the Seras or the Carlys of the world have slotted me.

If someone comes up and asks me what nationality I am, I’ll look at them and say that I'm an Australian with Italian blood flowing rapidly through my veins. I’ll say this with pride because it’s pride that I feel.

Asked on by wanderista

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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The sentence in which the protagonist compares Australian multiculturalism to something else is:

“ … multiculturalism … [is] as much part of Australian life as football and meat-pies.”

This sentence uses a figure of speech known as a simile. A simile is a direct or explicit comparison, using such words as “like” or “as”, for example “My love is like a red red rose …”. It differs from a metaphor in that a metaphor is an implicit comparison that does not use explicit terms of comparison such as “like” or “as”. Typically, both metaphor and simile function to explain the difficult, complex, or unfamiliar in terms of the simple and familiar. Thus multiculturalism, something some people may consider alien to Australia, is being compared to things most people associate with Australian identity.



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