What does Pozzo call Lucky?

In Waiting for Godot, Pozzo repeatedly calls Lucky a "pig" and a "hog." He also calls him "wicked." In this way, Pozzo treats Lucky like an animal. He degrades and abuses him shamelessly and cruelly.

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When we first meet Pozzo and Lucky, the latter has a rope tied around his neck and enters the stage first. He is followed by his master, Pozzo. The fact that Pozzo enters after Lucky signals that the rope serves as a lead, and this, in turn, implies that Lucky...

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When we first meet Pozzo and Lucky, the latter has a rope tied around his neck and enters the stage first. He is followed by his master, Pozzo. The fact that Pozzo enters after Lucky signals that the rope serves as a lead, and this, in turn, implies that Lucky (the name is, of course, deeply ironic) is as a dog to Pozzo. Lucky carries Pozzo's bags, and Pozzo carries a whip with which to strike Lucky. The first time Pozzo speaks he tells Vladimir and Estragon that Lucky is "wicked," suggesting that his abuse of Lucky is some kind of deserved punishment.

A little later, looking as if he is about to leave, he jerks at the rope and shouts at Lucky, "Up pig!" and "Up hog!" By speaking to Lucky in this way and by addressing him as a "pig" and a "hog," Pozzo is degrading and dehumanizing Lucky. As far as Pozzo is concerned, Lucky is an animal rather than a human and, like pigs, belongs in the dirt and exists to serve men.

Later in the play, once Lucky is given a hat, he actually proves to be capable of thought and speech, although much of it seems to be nonsensical. Nonetheless, he speaks for a considerable time, and sometimes his words are poetical—for example, "the flames the tears the stones so blue so calm." Lucky's monologue shows how much he has been reduced by Pozzo. There is in Lucky's words the suggestion of a man who was once articulate and thoughtful, which makes Pozzo's treatment of him, as a "pig" and a "hog," all the more appalling.

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