The Lake Isle of Innisfree by William Butler Yeats

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In "The Lake Isle of Innisfree," what does the poet find so attractive about the Lake Isle of Innisfree?

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When Yeats wrote "The Lake Isle of Innisfree" he was very much under the influence of Thoreau. As with the author of Walden, Yeats found the ideal of leading a simple life close to nature most appealing. This life of isolated rural bliss represents a haven of peace, far away from the madding crowds of the city. Even in the thick of the heaving throng, this Arcadian idyll still stirs the blood, retaining its hold upon the poet's imagination:

I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore; While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey, I hear it in the deep heart's core.

Yeats's reference to "the pavements grey" is instructive here. City life is colorless and drab, but the Lake Isle of Innisfree offers an escape into a glorious world of color and great natural...

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