Discuss the relevant elements of the poem "Night" from the Rig-Veda.The goddess Night has drawn near, looking about on many sides with her eyes. She has put on all her glories. The immortal goddess...

Discuss the relevant elements of the poem "Night" from the Rig-Veda.

The goddess Night has drawn near, looking about on many sides with her eyes. She has put on all her glories.
The immortal goddess has filled the wide space, the depths and the heights. She stems the tide of darkness with her light.
The goddess has drawn near, pushing aside her sister the twilight. Darkness, too, will give way.
As you came near to us today, we turned homeward to rest, as birds go to their home in a tree.
People who live in villages have gone home to rest, and animals with feet, and animals with wings, even the ever-searching hawks.
Ward off the she-wolf and the wolf; ward off the thief. O night full of waves, be easy for us to cross over.
Darkness--palpable black, and painted--has come upon me. O Dawn, banish it like a debt.
I have driven this hymn to you as the herdsman drives cows. Choose and accept it, O Night, daughter of the sky, like a song of praise to a conqueror.

Asked on by kayla94

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I think that the poem reflects much in way of Hindu beliefs regarding the forces of the divine.  The fact that the poem exalts the Goddess of the Night reflects how Hinduism's pantheism attributes different natural elements to different gods.  Notice in the poem how the Goddess of Night "pushes aside her sister the twilight."  In this light, one can see how Hinduism utilizes its pantheistic nature to attribute different aspects of consciousness to other forms of the divine.  Another uniquely Hindu element brought out in the poem is the yearning for a brief and close promixal interaction with the divine.  This is seen in Hinduism in many forms in that the devotee is thankful for a brief interaction with the divine. Hindus frequently ask the Gods to "open their eyes" and smile upon the devotee, and this same tendency to yearn  for a close and brief encounter with the divine is present in the poem.  Rest for humans only happens when the Goddess of Night is "near to us today."  The idea of the Goddess briefly coming near the devotee is a strongly Hindu idea.  Along these lines, Hindu practices follow the idea of "warding off the evil eye" or asking the powers of the divine to remove evil with the idea of "warding" it off.  The removal of obstacles is something of vital importance to the devotee.  This is seen in the poem with the plea to "ward off the she- wolf" and "the wolf" and "the thief."

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