What does the poem "The Lady's Dressing Room" by Jonathan Swift mean? What is the poem trying to prove? What is the message of the poem?

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Swift, as is his wont, is satirizing society and one of its most cherished, long-standing conventions. In Swift's day, women, especially women of quality, were idealized by men, placed on a pedestal to be admired for their charm, grace and beauty. And yet such women, like all of us, are only human. The unfortunate Strephon finds out just how human his mistress is when he creeps into her dressing-room one day. Swift sets out, in pretty lurid detail, the horrendous sight that assails poor Strephon's eyes. His mistress's clothes are filthy, as indeed are her combs; her handkerchief is encrusted with snot; she plasters her face with cosmetics made from a dog's intestines. And worst of all, this lady of quality feels the need to evacuate her bowels into a chamber-pot. The horror!

Of course, a moment's reflection would've told Strephon that we all have our dirty little secrets and that, yes, we all need to answer the call of nature from time to time. He's doubtless aware of that. But his...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 556 words.)

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