What does the moon symbolize in the "A Night to Remember" chapter?Beyond being called a fat white seed, Melinda mentions that the moon looked closer in August and during the rape, that the clouds...

What does the moon symbolize in the "A Night to Remember" chapter?

Beyond being called a fat white seed, Melinda mentions that the moon looked closer in August and during the rape, that the clouds cloaked the moon.

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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Beyond being called a fat white seed, Melinda mentions that the moon looked closer in August and during the rape, that the clouds cloaked the moon.

The moon has several possible interpretations in this chapter. When seen as a ‘fat white seed’ at the beginning, the moon represents Melinda’s germination from girl to woman as a consequence of that terrible night. She is ready to emerge; excited about the party and white with innocence.

 ‘The moon looked closer back in August.’

This line is presented a paragraph in itself. It is isolated, like Melinda. The August evening was full of promise and light; a light which disappears as she is attacked –

‘I’m trying to remember how we got onto the ground and where the moon went and wham!’

The moon illustrates how what seems so gentle and full of promise can be dangerous. In the moonlight, the ‘Greek God’ entrances Melinda. She sees him as someone who will care for her –

 ‘…ready to watch out for me.’

 As the setting goes dark, all around her changes:

 ‘Shadows look like photo negatives.’

The moon is bright and welcoming, but it illuminates the dark. Melinda realizes that the moon is as unreliable as her attacker-

‘Outside, the moon smiled goodbye and slipped away.’

The moon leaves, as does Melinda’s innocence.

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