What does Lucky's speech mean?

Although Lucky's speech in Waiting for Godot seems nonsensical on the surface, Lucky may be stating that while God created the earth and abandoned the project for reasons "unknown," people can still live and have physical existence in this creation.

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On the surface, Lucky's speech seems like nonsense, and, on one level, it is. It parodies academic language and shows how such specialized language and the citing of "experts" can obscure reality. On this level, Lucky spends a good deal of time nattering on incomprehensibly while saying very little.

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On the surface, Lucky's speech seems like nonsense, and, on one level, it is. It parodies academic language and shows how such specialized language and the citing of "experts" can obscure reality. On this level, Lucky spends a good deal of time nattering on incomprehensibly while saying very little.

On a deeper level, however, what Lucky says has a core meaning. First, he repeats the words "for reasons unknown" over and over, suggesting that audience members should pay attention to this utterance. Lucky is communicating that on some fundamental level, the ways of the "personal" God he talks about are unknowable.

Further, the human response to God, which, to Lucky, is to leave God's work on earth "unfinished," is also unknowable. Lucky, in one long, almost breathless sentence then makes a case that the creation of a physical earth, the creation of existence, is "better than nothing." The "calm" of the blue earth, so "still" even with its "cold," is something. We have materiality to cling to. This is why Lucky goes on so long about sports. They may seem ridiculous and tangential to the important academic questions at hand about life and meaning, but they are nevertheless representative of the plane in which life itself takes place. We can not say anything definitive about God, Lucky asserts, but we can live and move and be in the physical world, even if God has abandoned us or we him. Although dressed in parodic academese, this is a pragmatic statement about reality.

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