What does The Lowell Textile Workers suggest about the revolution that the country was undergoing economically and culturally?In the first half of the nineteenth century what did The Lowell...

What does The Lowell Textile Workers suggest about the revolution that the country was undergoing economically and culturally?

In the first half of the nineteenth century what did The Lowell Textile Workers suggest about the revolution that the country was undergoing economically and culturally?

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larrygates | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The primary inference one draws from the Lowell Textile Workers is the advent of the industrial revolution in America and the beginning of a factory manufacturing system in this country. Economically it indicates a shift from an agricultural economy to an industrial economy. It should be noted that this transformation was primarily in the Northeast; the Southern states tended to remain agricultural. Also because of the large production capacity of the factories (in the case of the Lowell workers it was textile mills) the entire United States became a single market, aided by increases in transportation such as railroads, canals and steam boats. This has often been called the "market revolution" by historians.

Socially, there was a demographic shift from the farm to the factory. Often young ladies but at times entire families moved from farming communities to working in the manufacturing sector. The early Lowell workers were unmarried young women. As a result of their separation from their families the Mill Company often assumed the role of parent by enforcing curfews and church attendance on Sundays.

The Lowell workers mark a demographic and economic shift in the country, primarily in the Northeast.

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