What does Lennie killing the puppy foreshadow?

In Of Mice and Men, Lennie's killing the puppy foreshadows his murder of Curley's wife. It is the same love that Lennie has for soft things that makes the puppy's fur and Curley's wife's hair so appealing.

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Lennie 's murder of the unfortunate puppy showcases his love of soft things and his inability to know his own strength and perceive when he is hurting or smothering a living creature. This foreshadows his accidental murder of Curley's wife, a known flirt and trouble-maker. Unfortunately, the lure of Curley's...

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Lennie's murder of the unfortunate puppy showcases his love of soft things and his inability to know his own strength and perceive when he is hurting or smothering a living creature. This foreshadows his accidental murder of Curley's wife, a known flirt and trouble-maker. Unfortunately, the lure of Curley's wife's soft hair was enough to make Lennie forget George's warning to stay far away from her.

The puppies have recently been born on the farm, and George arranges for Lennie to have one as a pet. While Lennie would never have intentionally harmed the puppy, he panicked after realizing it was dead and didn't know what to do. He knew it would get him into trouble with George and stand in his way of one day tending the rabbits on the farm that he and George planned to buy.

In the midst of his devastation, Curley's wife finds him and offers to console him by allowing him to stroke her hair. When he strokes too hard, however, she panics, and the ensuing struggle leads to a repeat of Lennie's earlier mistake.

To avoid having him face a lynch mob, George later shoots Lennie and murders him. It could therefore also be argued that Lennie's murder of the puppy foreshadows his own death.

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