What does it mean when Nick says, ". . . a promise that the rock of the world was founded securely on a fairy's wing"?

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The full sentence is as follows:

For a while these reveries provided an outlet for his imagination, they were a satisfactory hint of the unreality of reality, a promise that the rock of the world was founded securely on a fairy's wing.

In this chapter, a reporter from New York...

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The full sentence is as follows:

For a while these reveries provided an outlet for his imagination, they were a satisfactory hint of the unreality of reality, a promise that the rock of the world was founded securely on a fairy's wing.

In this chapter, a reporter from New York visits Gatsby to ask him to confirm some rumors he had heard about him, namely that Gatsby used to be a poor farm boy called James Gatz.

Nick continues to explain that James Gatz was on the beach one day when he saw the rich Dan Cody dropping anchor. Nick states that Gatsby had always believed that he was somebody special, and combined with a vivid imagination, "the most grotesque and fantastic conceits haunted him in his bed at night." From his perspective, his so-called reality as the son of poor farmers was untrue. It was an "unreality." In truth, he was not only destined for far bigger things, but the world owed it to him to give everything it had, or as Nick states, "a promise that the rock of the world was founded securely on a fairy's wing."

It was this self-belief that lead Gatsby to befriend Cody and eventually become part of high-class society.

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As the embodiment of the transcendence of man from reality to his own world of his imagination, Gatsby becomes "his Platonic conception of himself," an almost mythic hero. For, in his “Myths for Materialists” Mr. Jacques Barzun states that whether in fact or fiction,men who express their destinies, aspirations, or attitudes are invested with a mythical character.  As such a mythic character, Gatsby believes in the

...unreality of reality, a promise that the rock of the world was founded securely on a fairy's wing.

That is, Gatsby believes that he can recreate the past and reclaim Daisy now that he is wealthy since, after all, Daisy married Tom Buchanan for his wealth.  Therefore, he asks Nick to bring Daisy to his home so that she can view the resplendence in which he lives.  When Daisy arrives, her voice plays "murmurous tricks in her throat." But, as Nick says, Gatsby's "extraordinary gift for hope" is what makes him all right amid the profusion of champagne and the "many-colored, many keyed commotion." He cannot imagine that Daisy can refuse him; he believes in "the unreality of reality."

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