What does Hamlet mean when he says "this too, too sullied flesh"? (1.2.133)

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In act one, scene two, Claudius demands that Hamlet stop mourning his father and wearing black clothes to outwardly express his depression. Claudius urges Hamlet to get over his father's death and to accept him as his new father. He goes on to say that Hamlet is acting irrational and requests that he remain in Denmark instead of traveling back to Wittenberg for school. When Hamlet agrees to stay in Denmark, Claudius is pleased and says that he will celebrate by drinking heavily tonight. When everyone exits the scene, Hamlet begins his soliloquy by saying,

"Oh, that this too, too sullied flesh would melt, Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew, Or that the Everlasting had not fixed His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God, God!" (Shakespeare, 1.2.129-132).

Hamlet is essentially saying that he wishes that his dirty (sullied) flesh would melt and vaporize into dew before he laments the fact that God has created a law against suicide. The word "sullied" suggests that Hamlet feels tainted...

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