What does the gravedigger scene reveal about Hamlet?

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All true.  This particular scene in Hamlet is one of the most introspective scenes in the play outside of the soliloquies, it seems to me.  Because these "clowns" don't know who he is, he is able to speak without pretense, which he does through much of the rest of the play--so much so that we're not alwayssure when he's serious and when he's putting on his "antic disposition."  When he talks to them, Hamlet is funny and witty, enjoying wordplay as we know he does throughout.  When he and Horatio are watching one of the gravediggers uncover the skull of what turns out to be Yorrick, Hamlet it pensive.  He reflects, as he does many times in the play, on the concept of death; however, he does so here in a much more somber and final way--a clear foreshadowing of his impending death. 

His observation is that everyone is equal at death--Alexander the Great and Caesar are just as dead as his former friend, the jester Yorrick. All of them--and all of us--end up in the same place, mingling...

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