Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Lord of the Flies book cover
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What does William Golding reveal about human nature in Lord of the Flies?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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As was mentioned in the previous post, William Golding reveals humanity's inherent wickedness throughout the novel. Initially, the boys attempt to create a democratic society in order to survive on the island. However, the boys gradually descend into savagery as the novel progresses. The belief in the beast terrifies the boys and causes disorder among them. During Simon's encounter with the Lord of the Flies, Golding reveals the central issue concerning human nature. The Lord of the Flies tells Simon that the beast is inside each boy and cannot be killed. This scene depicts Golding's cynical view of humanity and suggests that humans are inherently wicked. Golding's setting also alludes to the Biblical account of the fall of man, which takes place in the Garden of Eden. The boys go from...

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