What does freedom mean from Mr. Lockton's point of view?

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Freedom for Mr. Lockton primarily means the freedom to be left alone by the rebels. A fervent Loyalist—that is to say a supporter of the British government—Lockton just wants to be left in peace so that he can live the kind of life he wants to live. His concern for...

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Freedom for Mr. Lockton primarily means the freedom to be left alone by the rebels. A fervent Loyalist—that is to say a supporter of the British government—Lockton just wants to be left in peace so that he can live the kind of life he wants to live. His concern for his own freedom is matched only by his contempt for others' freedom. As a deeply selfish man, Lockton couldn't care less about Ruth and Isabel's freedom. If there's one thing he shares with most rebels, it's an unwavering belief in the justness of slavery and white supremacy.

On the domestic front, freedom for Lockton means that he gets to control his slaves with a rod of iron. As far as he's concerned, he's the king of his own castle, and that gives him the right to do as he pleases. The same principle extends to his wife. Lockton thinks nothing of subjecting his wife to a regime of domestic tyranny.

In both cases, Lockton's freedom is based on the lack of freedom of others, whether it's his wife or his slaves. In Lockton's limited understanding, freedom is a zero-sum game; if some in society have freedom, then that can only mean that there are others who do not. He's just fine with such an unjust arrangement, so long as he gets to be free.

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