What does the feud symbolize in The Adventues of Huckleberry Finn? Does this remind of you any famous piece of literature? Explain. Through the feud incident, Twain satirizes human traits and...

What does the feud symbolize in The Adventues of Huckleberry Finn? Does this remind of you any famous piece of literature? Explain.

Through the feud incident, Twain satirizes human traits and behaviors. Discuss.

Asked on by kmr1

2 Answers

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

To answer the second question first, the feud is reminiscent of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, in which a feud between the Montagues and Capulets makes forbidden the love between Romeo and Juliet.

The feud of the Grangerfords and the Shepherdsons bears some similarity to that between the Capulets and the Montagues. For instance, Johnse Hatfield, the son of the patriarch of the McCoys, William Anderson Hatfield, known as Devil Anse, encountered Roseanna McCoy on a local election day gathering. They soon fell in love. Later on at another election day gathering, a fight began among three of Randolph McCoy’s sons and two brothers of Devil Anse, the patriarch. This fight ended when one of the Hatfield men was stabbed in an incident something like the murder of Mercutio.

In his novel Twain satirizes the foolishness and cruelty of people as they focus on trivialities and take revenge upon things that are certainly not worthy of their lives. In their hatred for each other, the Grangerfords and Shepherdsons kill off their entire families.

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epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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Critics of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn have suggested numerous interpretations to the feud, the most popular and agreed-upon being that it represents the fighting between France and England. No one can argue that there is not an enormous amount of European  influence in the novel, and in the manner of the homes of the Grangerfords and the other, their homes are ostentatious, filled with tacky and gauche items, and with a terribly written ode, it is obvious that the portrayals of European fighting can not be ignored. England and France fought for years, after a while, many people no longer knew why. The European value of war being adventurous, exciting, honorable, magnificent, and valiant, comes to a screeching human stop in the bloodshed within the feud.