What does "exiled love" mean in A. D. Hope's "The Death of the Bird"?

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In "The Death of the Bird" by A. D. Hope, "exiled love" refers to the feeling that the bird has for the warm, distant lands that she's visited every year of her adult life. As a migratory bird, she gets to experience all kinds of strange, exotic lands, with their...

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In "The Death of the Bird" by A. D. Hope, "exiled love" refers to the feeling that the bird has for the warm, distant lands that she's visited every year of her adult life. As a migratory bird, she gets to experience all kinds of strange, exotic lands, with their vast deserts, palm trees, palaces, and temples. Happy memories of these remarkable voyages sustain the bird during those months she spends at home, building her nest and feeding her chicks. Though temporarily exiled from these lands, she is still nourished by the enormous love she has for such faraway places.

What makes this all the more poignant and tragic is that the bird is now coming up to that sad moment that all migratory birds experience at some point in their lives: a sense that this migration will be her last. As she embarks upon her final journey, she knows that she will never return home, that as she makes her lonely way across the vast expanses of burning desert, and that this land, the land beneath her beating wings, will be her final resting place. The exile of migration, which had taken place for only a few months each year, is now set to be a permanent condition.

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