What does the  The Declaration of Independence reveal about the main causes behind the war of independence?  

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The Declaration of Independence reveals deeply embedded causes for the war of independence in colonial society.

Upon reading Jefferson's document, it is clear that the call for war was not something that the Colonists took lightly.  It was not instantaneous. Rather, The Declaration of Independence  shows that the reasons for...

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The Declaration of Independence reveals deeply embedded causes for the war of independence in colonial society.

Upon reading Jefferson's document, it is clear that the call for war was not something that the Colonists took lightly.  It was not instantaneous. Rather, The Declaration of Independence shows that the reasons for separating from England took place over time and were deeply rooted in the way Colonists saw the world and their place in it.

One way that the Declaration of Independence reveals the main causes for war with England is in its call for human rights.  The document's Preamble and the Statement on Human Rights argues that there are specific entitlements that every human being should experience.  When these are absent, a cause for change is evident:

When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

Jefferson's Preamble articulates that violating the natural rights that human beings possess represents a reason for separation and a cause for war. Colonists were able to see their struggle against England as a struggle for human rights, compelling them to embrace change.

From the universal, Jefferson focuses on the specific. The Declaration of Independence does not only make a case for separation on a human rights level, but also in the specific experiences of the Colonists. Jefferson details his charges against the British King and of Parliament in the middle of the document.  When Jefferson says, "let facts be submitted to a candid world," he justifies a war for Colonial independence.  Charges such as "He [King George III] has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good," or that the British government has "obstructed the Administration of Justice," and "For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent," resonated with colonists.  Jefferson understood that making charges like these public allowed colonists to share a common experience. Many of them had experienced the injustices that the Jefferson identifies. These charges showed the deep grievances that Colonists held against the British, and reveal that the main causes for independence existed on a structural level.

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