What does the author, Ernest Hemingway, do to make the novel, The Old Man and the Sea, effective?When I say effective, I am taking about effective under the category of the authors style/writing....

What does the author, Ernest Hemingway, do to make the novel, The Old Man and the Sea, effective?

When I say effective, I am taking about effective under the category of the authors style/writing. Thanks for the help!

Expert Answers
Lori Steinbach eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I'm guessing there could be quite a few answers to this question; however, when you narrow it down to style, I think the one answer would have to be Hemingway's simple writing style in The Old Man and the Sea.  It's not simplistic--which means too basic or rudimentary, often insulting to readers.  It is simple--clean and unadorned and no-frills.  There aren't, for example, long, flowery passages of description.  Instead, he captures the beauty and majesty of the ocean and the fish and the birds in a few effective lines such as these: 

The clouds were building up now for the trade wind and he looked ahead and saw a flight of wild ducks etching themselves against the sky over the water, then blurring, then etching again and he knew no man was ever alone on the sea.

Hemingway's language is simple and straightforward, much like the story he tells.  This is a simple man living a simple life.  He asks for little and is thannkful for the provision of the sea.  He sees the great fish as his brother, and the readers feel and sense his great loss at the end of the story, a loss far greater than money.

This novella is effectively written because the simple, clean writing style matches everything in the story--the characters, the setting, the plot, and the theme. 

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The Old Man and the Sea

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