What does Atticus say is the result of naming people after Confederate generals?

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Aunt Alexandra and Atticus are at home, discussing the mob who confronted Atticus at the jail. Continuing to try and exert her influence on the way the children are raised, Alexandra is voicing her disapproval of the actions the children took, leaving home so late at night. Atticus indicates he...

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Aunt Alexandra and Atticus are at home, discussing the mob who confronted Atticus at the jail. Continuing to try and exert her influence on the way the children are raised, Alexandra is voicing her disapproval of the actions the children took, leaving home so late at night. Atticus indicates he is pleased his children showed up as they helped to disperse the situation.

In attempting to prove her case, she tells Atticus that Mr. Braxton Bragg Underwood was there all the time and infers that Mr. Underwood would have protected Atticus should the need arise. Atticus counters Alexandra's comments with information about Mr. Underwood's character and name. He informs her that Underwood despises Negroes, undermining Alexandra's inference that Underwood might have protected Atticus had the children not been there. Atticus further comments that Underwood was named after Confederate General Braxton Bragg, something Underwood has long tried to live down. Atticus goes on to state his thought that naming anyone after a Confederate general leads to slow, steady drinking.

Interestingly, historical information states that Braxton Bragg actually lamented the use of alchohol by the soldiers, stating that it had led to many deaths.

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In chapter 16, the Finches and Calpurnia are discussing the events of the previous evening regarding Tom Robinson.  Aunt Alexandra states that Mr. Underwood had been at the scene the whole time.  We find out that Mr. Underwood is a racist, nasty man.  Mr. Underwood's father named him Braxton Bragg. which Mr. Underwood has always tried to live down.  Mr. Underwood doesn't like the name because it is the name of a Confederate general.  Atticus states that people who are named after Confederate generals make, ". . . slow, steady drinkers" (chapter 16).

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Shortly into chapter sixteen, Scout reflected, "Atticus said naming people after Confederate generals made slow steady drinkers."  She was referring to Mr. Underwood who was given the Braxton Bragg Underwood by his father.  Bragg was a general in the Confederate army during the civil war who had the same intense, temporal personality as Mr. Underwood.

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The morning after Atticus had faced the lynch mob at the jail, the subject of Mr. Underwood came up since he had taken it upon himself to stand guard over Atticus from an upstairs room over the newspaper office, armed with a double-barreled shotgun. Scout recalled her memory of Mr. Underwood:

Local opinion held Mr. Underwood to be an intense, profane little man, whose father in a fey fit of humor christened Braxton Bragg, a name Mr. Underwood had done his best to live down. Atticus said naming people after Confederate generals made slow steady drinkers [italics added here].

Instead of trying to live up to the name, Mr. Underwood chose another path, but his character clearly was intact the night of the lynch mob visit. Also, Atticus' wry comment indicated how he viewed clinging to the idea of some romantic Southern past.

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