What does act 1, scene 5 of Macbeth reveal about Macbeth and Lady Macbeth's relationship?

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Act 1, scene 5 opens with Lady Macbeth reading a letter sent to her by her husband, detailing his encounter with the witches . Considering just how potentially incriminating this information might be (even without the assassination, one can easily imagine that news of this encounter with the witches would...

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Act 1, scene 5 opens with Lady Macbeth reading a letter sent to her by her husband, detailing his encounter with the witches. Considering just how potentially incriminating this information might be (even without the assassination, one can easily imagine that news of this encounter with the witches would hurt his standing with the Crown), this suggests that Macbeth places a great deal of trust in Lady Macbeth. As the scene continues, one gets the sense that the two are political partners and collaborators in addition to husband and wife.

At the same time, it's interesting to note how Lady Macbeth defies the traditional expectations of femininity, even denouncing those qualities as she perceives them in herself. She is ruthlessly ambitious, to such a degree that she criticizes her husband as being held back by his kindness, and she takes the initiative, telling Macbeth to leave the plotting of Duncan's murder to herself. In this, she also reveals her deceitfulness, instructing Macbeth,

bear welcome in your eye,

Your hand, your tongue; look like the innocent flower,

But be the serpent under it. (Macbeth, act 1, scene 5)

Thus, in addition to being Macbeth's wife, she is also a ruthless political operator, driven by ambition to secure her husband's advancement to the throne and willing to employ murder to achieve those ends. This establishes the characterization that will be so critical in act 1, scene 7, when Macbeth suffers a crisis of conscience and Lady Macbeth asserts herself over her husband, castigating him to ensure he goes through with Duncan's murder.

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In act one, scene five, Macbeth and his wife appear to be kindred spirits, who are extremely close and aware of each other's intentions. They are equally ambitious and willing to assassinate King Duncan in order to usurp the throne. At the beginning of the scene, Macbeth informs his wife of about the seemingly favorable prophecies and trusts her with the sensitive information. Macbeth also refers to his wife as his "dearest partner of greatness" and is excited to inform her about the positive news. In a moving soliloquy, Lady Macbeth calls upon evil spirits to consume her and cannot wait to encourage her husband to act swiftly. Although she fears that Macbeth may be too full of "human kindness," Lady Macbeth believes that she will be able to convince her husband to follow through with the bloody crime.

When Macbeth finally arrives home, he addresses Lady Macbeth as his "dearest love" and informs her that King Duncan will arrive at their castle tonight. Lady Macbeth responds by instructing him to appear amicably in the king's presence and disguise his bloody intentions. Both Macbeth and his wife share the same dreams and are depicted as ambitious and resolute in their desire to usurp the throne. They are both conniving individuals, who act in one accord and are willing to commit regicide. Macbeth displays love and affection towards his wife and Lady Macbeth shares the same feelings towards him. In this scene, Macbeth and his wife have a trusting, loving relationship and share the same dream of ruling Scotland. They are equally ambitious and willing to assassinate the king in order to usurp the throne.

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Act 1, scene 5 in Macbeth shows that Lady Macbeth is at first more bloodthirsty and aggressive than Macbeth is. She receives the news of the witches' prophecy from Macbeth and immediately decides that she must persuade Macbeth to take action. Although Lady Macbeth knows that Macbeth is ambitious, she says, "Yet do I fear thy nature; / It is too full o’ th’ milk of human kindness / To catch the nearest way" (1.5.16-18). Lady Macbeth believes that Macbeth is too kind and soft to take advantage of the situation that could make him king. Lady Macbeth fears that Macbeth is too full of honor and would not cheat anyone, and he might therefore lose his opportunity.

Lady Macbeth appeals to heaven, asking that the spirits "unsex me here, / And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full / Of direst cruelty" (1.5.48-50). Lady Macbeth believes that she must become the "man" and push Macbeth towards his destiny, because he will not do it himself.

When Macbeth arrives, Lady Macbeth advises him that his face is too honest, saying "Your face, my thane, is as a book where men / May read strange matters" (1.5.73-74). She advises him to act innocent but plan a way to kill Duncan in secret.
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Act I, Scene 5 of Macbeth reveals that Lady Macbeth and Macbeth are doppelgangers [German for "evil twin"]; that is, they have become doubles of each other. 

In their connection in violence with the plot to kill King Duncan, Lady Macbeth becomes more masculine, and like her husband, she invokes the spirits. She calls upon the preternatural world to unsex her. 

And fill me, from the crown to the tow, top-full
Of direst cruelty!

This plea of Lady Macbeth asks the spirits to allow her to possess a similar nature as that of her husband, Macbeth. For, he has recently displayed "direst cruelty" himself as he has fought the traitorous Macdonwald, the Thane of Cawdor, who has conspired with the Irish. The brutal Macbeth has "unseamed him from the nave to th' chops" (1.5.22).

So, when Macbeth enters, Lady Macbeth informs her husband that Duncan comes that night to their home, and he can leave all the rest to her: 

                                          ...you shall put
This night’s great business into my dispatch,
Which shall to all our nights and days to come
Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom. (1.5.79-82)

She now plans things with knives and swords (the murder of the king), in the manner of her brutal husband who slay Macdonwald.

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