What do you think the word "monster" means in Mary Shelleys novel, Frankenstein?Mary Shelley's novel makes a powerful commentary on monstrosity, including the paradox that shows that , at times,...

What do you think the word "monster" means in Mary Shelleys novel, Frankenstein?

Mary Shelley's novel makes a powerful commentary on monstrosity, including the paradox that shows that , at times, Victor Frankenstein is more monstrous than his own creation. What does "monster" really mean in Frankenstein?

Asked on by bobbie227

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M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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The word "monster" in itself has been changed through editions. The original manuscript used the word "daemon", others uses "creature", and some modern versions use "monster."

All imply one same thing: Aberration. Something so unexpected, unpredictable, primal, and primitive that it shakes the foundation of our reality.

In the interchangeable semantics of the word itself, the actual demon, creature, and monster of unpredictable, primal, and primitive behavior we find in the story is definitely Victor, who acted upon his desperate urges to have a power to create, which is an impossibility. Also, his treatment of the monster, the hungers of ambition which seized him, and the fact that he challenged nature and the sanctity of life itself, makes him a bigger creature, monster, and demon than the creation that grew out of his aberration.

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