What do you think motivates Da-duh and the narrator to try to triumph over each other?

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Da-duh sees the fierceness in her granddaughter’s eyes when they first meet in the shed at the boat landing. Da-duh is immediately challenged to teach her granddaughter a lesson and takes her “under her wing” to convince her that the way of life in Barbados is superior than the one...

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Da-duh sees the fierceness in her granddaughter’s eyes when they first meet in the shed at the boat landing. Da-duh is immediately challenged to teach her granddaughter a lesson and takes her “under her wing” to convince her that the way of life in Barbados is superior than the one in New York. It becomes a mission for Da-duh to convince her granddaughter that there is “no place like home” and to not forget her roots.  She takes the narrator into the sugar cane fields, points out the beautiful, tall palm trees, and leads her into the magical places in the gully on her property. The narrator is in awe, and agrees that there is nothing like this in Brooklyn, New York, but she, too, is insistent on teaching Da-duh about the wonders of her world.  Da-duh quickly becomes under the spell of her granddaughter’s descriptions of electricity, tall buildings, and even a place where black girls beat up white girls.  They teach each other in the story, and it is in the end that we see Da-duh’s influence on the narrator who dreams of palm trees and sugar cane by painting murals on the walls of her apartment.   

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