What do you see your city looking like in the future. Focus on political, social, environmental, etc. aspects of your townWhat do you see your city looking like in the future. Focus on political,...

What do you see your city looking like in the future. Focus on political, social, environmental, etc. aspects of your town

What do you see your city looking like in the future. Focus on political, social, environmental, etc. aspects of your town

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I live in a suburb of a larger city. Although my city has grown a lot in the last decade or so, it was also designed with some environmental considerations in mind. There are wildlife reserves where no building is allowed. This means that there is preservation of open space and a lot of birds and animals that normally might not still be here. I am optimistic that these areas sill remain preserved in the future.
besure77's profile pic

besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Focusing on the environmental aspect, I do have a positive outlook on the future. I believe that environmental awareness is definitely growing. People are becoming more and more educated on what needs to be done to help keep the environment clean.

sharrons's profile pic

sharrons | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

Raleigh NC

This small city has seen a lot of growth in the past 10 years.  Due to big colleges in a 20 mile radius (Duke University, UNC Chapel Hill NC State) and the Research Triangle Park, we are seeing a number of people moving here from other parts of the country.

There has been some talk of getting a rail system, which I think would be AWESOME. 

In the future Raleigh will continue to grow and prosper.  It is a wonderful place to live, and even if I leave I will always come back.

www.freethingsforteachers.com

 

alohaspirit's profile pic

alohaspirit | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted on

Well I live in Honolulu, and we have many challenges ahead of us.  In the future I would like to see more Native Hawaiians with rightful land ownership and having a stronger voice in the government.  I would like to see Hawaii focus more on local products and building an economy based on the goods we can grow here instead of constantly paying high prices for imported goods.  I would like to see more environmental protection, and the death of some projects like the Rail which is going to ruin the natural beauty of Oahu.  I hope to see Hawaii more independent, and not rely on some much federal aid.  Hopefully with the strength of our citizens we will see a Hawaii that is good for tourism but also good for the locals that live here.

drmonica's profile pic

drmonica | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

I live in a small town, not a city, and I see it becoming more populated in the future by second-home owners and retirees due to skyrocketing costs of living and property values. We have a strong focus on environmental issues in our town, such as recycling and preservation of green space, and I see that trend continuing. Drugs are a terrible problem in the region and have infiltrated our little enclave; I see this problem worsening rather than improving in the future. Our town is also experiencing difficulty getting blue-collar and minimum-wage workers, along with nurses, because of the high cost of housing; there is intense resistance to building affordable housing.

dbello's profile pic

dbello | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

Well for me there is The City of New York before 9-11 and The City of New York after 9-11. Although I live on Staten Island, (part of the city, S.I, Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and Manhattan) not in my wildest dreams could I have imagined that I would witness what I witnessed that day. (Staten Islanders saw the horror up close and personal, my mother and brothers were missing for an extended period of time, thanks be to God they came home safe) So with regard to your post I think I already see some of New York's future and it is disconcerning at best. I understand the reasons why, for example whenever I attend a Broadway play, concert at Madison Square Garden or The Beacon Theater I am checked and rechecked as if I am suspect of the worst possible. Now this is not to suggest that before 9-11 there wasn't any security in New York City because there was. It  just feels different, every New Yorker knows why the scrunity exists, and it is so incredibility invasive. Moreover, it envokes sadness in my heart and I would argue most New Yorkers' hearts too. This has spilled over into the economics of New York City as well. For example, part of Wall Street looks like an armed fortress and The Statue of Liberty in some weird way has taken on the characteristics of a liability. From what I see most New Yorkers realize their society has been transformed out of necessity, however make no mistake just because people aren't screaming and yelling everyday doesn't mean these experiences aren't front and center in their minds, because they are.(Just ask a New Yorker who rides the subways what the most immediate thought is) I believe the future of New York City will result in many more restrictions in order to keep all of us safe, it is just too bad that now New York City will never be the same because of that BEFORE and AFTER mindset.

epollock's profile pic

epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

I am not to optimistic about the prospects for my city due to the recent world financial crisis. I see an existing bureaucracy having hard time dealing with basic state services, and if the state has to rely on the federal government for subsidies, my city might not be expanding or even maintaining a the current level of protections, safety, and services that they now provide.

Politically, Warwick and Providence have had just as colorful a history as Chicago.  Due to many outside influences, the politics and culture of politics hasn't changed and all too often we are promised one thing, but receive another. We are still a heavily democratic New England town, and our politics is deep in tradition of the "good old boys' club." When we had our state banking crisis in the 1980s (RISDIC), people realized we had too much corruption and graft in the system.

Socially, we are on the liberal side of the spectrum, along with other New England towns. And environmentally, we tend to lead the country in recycling apparatus ands industry because of our small size and waste management is a serious threat ot the environment and health of citizens here. 

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