What do you learn in 9th Grade English Grammar?I'm currently in a French school due to the laws in Quebec. My primary language is english. I'm going to move and applying to an English school. At my...

What do you learn in 9th Grade English Grammar?

I'm currently in a French school due to the laws in Quebec. My primary language is english. I'm going to move and applying to an English school. At my French school, we learn 4 hours of english in a week, but I don't really know if I know the 9th Grade English Grammer from an English school. So, in 8th Grade, we learned : Irregular/Regular Verbs, Simple Future tense, Simple Past tense, Simple Present tense, Adjectif's order, Superlatives, Comparatives, etc. Am I late or safe?

Thank you.

Asked on by pagn

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mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

If you have learned French while at this school, you have been also learning English because French is the grandparent of English since for hundreds of years French influenced the great island of England. (1066-1300 approximately)  Essentially the structure of the two languages are very similar, so you may come to realize that you have learned much about English while you have been away.

hilahmarca's profile pic

hilahmarca | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

You are on the right track.  In my 9th grade English classes, I review a lot of what you learned in 8th grade such as parts of speech and tenses.  I also teach superlatives and comparatives which is information most students have seen for the first time. 

What I would suggest is you independently learn subject/verb agreement, pronoun/antecedent agreement, and parallel structure.

I also teach the different rules for commas and semi colons in the 9th grade.  The main comma rules I teach are to use commas in a series, use a comma before a conjunction when it combines two independent clauses, and to use a comma between a dependent and independent clause.  As for semi colons, I simply tell them to use it between two independent clauses when the ideas in the two statements are closely related.

Finally, you should also be familiar with the difference between passive and active voice and how to change one into the other.  For example:

Active voice:  Tom Brady threw the ball.

Pasive voice:  The ball was thrown by Tom Brady.

If you are proficient with the above skills, you will definitely be up to speed with your peers, for these lessons are in line with the California State Standards for 9th and 10th grade.

 

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