What do you think the setting of The Most Dangerous Game is?

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epollock's profile pic

epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

tyra,

"The Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Connell was published in 1924. Greatly anthologized, and the author's most famous work, the short story features as its protagonist a big game hunter from New York, who falls off a yacht and swims to an isolated island in the Caribbeans, the setting of the story, and then is hunted by a Russian aristocrat.

The story explores the opposite of the big-game hunting safaris in Africa that were popular among wealthy Americans in the 1920s.

The story pits Sanger Rainsford, an accomplished and experienced hunter from New York, as the prey, against General Zaroff, a Russian aristocrat.

The eventual ending of the story is only alluded to as Rainsford makes the remark, "He had never slept in a better bed." This implies that Rainsford had somehow killed Zaroff.

boryung's profile pic

boryung | Middle School Teacher

Posted on

There are several settings in Richard Connell's The Most Dangerous Game.

The first setting is the ship that Rainsford, with his companion Whitney, is on. They are heading towards a destination that is not revealed by the author. The setting quickly changed, however, as Rainsford, who is the protagonist, falls off the ship and ends up stranded on Ship-Trap Island.

Ship-Trap Island is the more prominent setting in the story. Within this setting, there are some sub-settings: Zaroff's castle, the forest, and the shore. On this island, the main events in the story occur. Rainsford meets General Zaroff in his castle and finds out about the general's dastardly behavior. Then, outside of the castle in the forest, a hunt occurs. The general chases Rainsford all over the island to the shore, where Rainsford jumps off a cliff into the sea. The story returns to the previous setting of Zaroff's castle at the ending: Rainsford confronts General Zaroff in his bedroom. It is implied that Rainsford killed the general.  

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