A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings by Gabriel García Márquez

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What does the story "A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings" say about people?

What does the story "A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings" say about people?

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The villagers in "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" are portrayed as people who are overly stuck in their ways of living to the point of being oblivious of anything outside their immediate world. Such is the typical portrayal of life in a small, enmeshed, and isolated village, much like in the town of Macondo in Garcia's novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

In "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings," something extraordinary happens: a seemingly-otherworldly creature crashes in the backyard of Pelayo and Elisenda's house. By this time, the couple is too busy worrying about their baby's health, dead crabs in the house, and the constant rain. As such, their reaction to this unusual phenomenon will be quite telling.

Because they are so absorbed in the needs of their daily life, the way that they react to the creature, a very raggedy old man with huge wings, is by approaching him with the same inquiry methods that they would apply to any other thing: they stare, they make conjectures, and then they try...

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