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A Midsummer Night's Dream

by William Shakespeare
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What do these lines mean: "Fairy King, attend, and mark: / I do hear the morning lark"?

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This line is spoken by Robin Goodfellow (also known as Puck) in Act IV, Scene 1 of this play.

All that Puck is saying here is that it is morning and the King of the Fairies (Oberon) should wake up.  The word "attend" means something like "listen" or "pay attention." ...

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This line is spoken by Robin Goodfellow (also known as Puck) in Act IV, Scene 1 of this play.

All that Puck is saying here is that it is morning and the King of the Fairies (Oberon) should wake up.  The word "attend" means something like "listen" or "pay attention."  The word "mark" means something like "notice."   So Puck is saying "Hey, listen Fairy King, listen and notice what you are hearing.  It is a morning lark."

When he hears that, Oberon tells his Queen, Titania, that they should get going and head off to someplace where it will still be night.

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