What is the disturbance referred to on page 4?

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In chapter one, Scout gives a brief description of her heritage by elaborating on the exploits of her ancestor, Simon Finch, who immigrated to the United States and established a homestead on the banks of the Alabama River named Finch's Landing. Scout goes on to mention that Finch's Landing was a self-sufficient homestead, and the plantation made Simon a wealthy man. Scout then says,

Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land." (Lee, 4)

The "disturbance" that Scout is referring to is the Civil War, which resulted in a Northern victory and the abolition of slavery. The Civil War drastically affected Simon's business, and he lost the majority of his wealth since his plantation, which relied on slave labor, could no longer thrive. Despite his misfortunes, Finch's Landing remained in the family and was passed down through generations. In the story, Aunt Alexandra still lives on Finch's Landing, and Scout's family gathers there to celebrate Christmas in chapter nine.

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I do not think I have the same edition of the book that you do, because the word "disturbance" is not on page 4 in my book.  However, in Chapter 1, we see the following phrase used, and I think it is the one you are asking about.

Simon would have regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North and the South, as it left his descendants stripped of everything but their land...

In this case, you should be able to figure out what the disturbance was given the fact that the author refers to the North and the South.  This is clearly a euphemistic way of referring to the Civil War.  This makes sense given that many Southerners lost most of their possessions during the war.

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