What is the difference between venue and jurisdiction?

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Although people often use these two terms interchangeably, there is a difference between them.  Venue is a term that is purely geographic.  Jurisdiction has a geographic component to it, but it also has aspects that have nothing to do with geography or location.

Venue is simply a geographic location.  A...

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Although people often use these two terms interchangeably, there is a difference between them.  Venue is a term that is purely geographic.  Jurisdiction has a geographic component to it, but it also has aspects that have nothing to do with geography or location.

Venue is simply a geographic location.  A case must be filed in the proper venue.  If a contract is made in County A, for example, a lawsuit having to do with that contract must also be filed in County A, not in County B.  County A is the proper venue for that lawsuit.  Venue, then, is just a geographical term.

Jurisdiction refers to the right of a court to hear and judge a particular case.  This does have partly to do with geography.  A court in one area may not have jurisdiction over a case from another area.  However, this is not all there is to it.  Jurisdiction also has to do with what kinds of cases a court has a legal right to hear.  For example, a drug court only has jurisdiction over certain drug cases.  Any cases that have to do with other subject matter fall outside its jurisdiction, even if they are from the correct geographic area.

Thus, venue is only geographic whereas jurisdiction is based on more than just geography.

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