What is the difference in photosynthesis and respiration in eukaryotic microorganisms and bacteria?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Bacteria are prokaryotes--their genetic material is not contained within  a nucleus. Because they are also so small, it is easier to get the necessary products of photosynthesis and respiration to all parts of the (one-celled) organism, than it is in eukaryotes. In eukaryotic plants, photosynthesis takes place within the chloroplasts, and...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Bacteria are prokaryotes--their genetic material is not contained within  a nucleus. Because they are also so small, it is easier to get the necessary products of photosynthesis and respiration to all parts of the (one-celled) organism, than it is in eukaryotes. In eukaryotic plants, photosynthesis takes place within the chloroplasts, and respiration in the mitochondria. In prokaryotes such as bacteria, it is not necessary to have specific organelles devoted to these functions as, again, the cells are so small. These process instead take place in the cytoplasmic membrane, in extensions or infoldings. The link I attached has a great, simple list of the major differences between eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team