What is the difference between elements, compounds and mixtures including the type and arrangement of particles?  

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Atoms, elements, compounds, and mixtures are all forms of matter. Matter is defined as anything that has mass and volume.

Atoms, elements, and compounds are all pure substances. A pure substance is made of only one type of particle. However, mixtures are made of more than one pure substance that do...

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Atoms, elements, compounds, and mixtures are all forms of matter. Matter is defined as anything that has mass and volume.

Atoms, elements, and compounds are all pure substances. A pure substance is made of only one type of particle. However, mixtures are made of more than one pure substance that do not chemically combine.

An atom is the smallest unit of matter. Atoms are composed of three subatomic particles. The three subatomic particles of an atom are protons, neutrons, and electrons. The protons and neutrons are found within the central nucleus of an atom. The electrons move around the nucleus in either an orbital or cloud.

Compounds are composed of two or more atoms of different elements. The atoms that make up compounds  are chemically bound via either ionic, covalent, or metallic bonds. The ratio of the atoms within a compound never changes. For example, water (H2O) is a compound. Water always contains two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. The shape of a compound is dependent on the type and number of atoms that it contains.

Mixtures are made of combinations of different substances. The quantity and arrangement of the substances that make up a mixture can fluctuate. Trail mix and salads are examples of mixtures.

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Substances can be classified as elements, compounds or mixtures. 

An element is the purest substance possible and is composed of (almost) the same particles. In other words, each element is made up of similar atoms (similar, because isotopes are also there). These constituent particles have the same number of protons and electrons and have same properties. Some examples of elements are carbon, iron, sodium, etc. Elements can be solid, liquid or gas at room temperature and hence the arrangement of constituent atoms can be different.

A compound is made up of 2 or more elements, combined in a specific ratio. A compound has different properties than the constituent atoms. For example, water or H2O is composed of hydrogen and oxygen atoms in a fixed 2:1 ratio. Hydrogen is very combustible and oxygen is required for combustion, yet their compound water is used for extinguishing fires. The constituent atoms of a compound are present in a fixed ratio (for example, 1:2 carbon to oxygen atom ratio in carbon dioxide). It is difficult to break down a compound in its constituent atoms or elements.

A mixture is made up of 2 or more compounds, mixed in any ratio. Individual constituents of a mixture retain their individual properties, unlike compounds. The constituents of a mixture can be separated by physical processes. An example is the trail mix. Depending on whether the mixture is homogeneous or heterogeneous, the individual particles maybe uniformly or non-uniformly mixed.

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