What is the difference between the people Macon meets on Singleton Street, and those with whom he usually lives (Charles, Porter, and Rose)?

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Macon's siblings (Rose, Charles, and Porter) are much like Macon--they are reclusive, they value order, and they cling to the "Leary way" of doing things. Muriel's neighborhood and Singleton Street in particular are the complete opposite of the Leary's protected and predictable world. While it is an uncomfortably different world...

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Macon's siblings (Rose, Charles, and Porter) are much like Macon--they are reclusive, they value order, and they cling to the "Leary way" of doing things. Muriel's neighborhood and Singleton Street in particular are the complete opposite of the Leary's protected and predictable world. While it is an uncomfortably different world for Macon, it is in this setting that he eventually moves beyond the narrowness of his life and his family's narrow perspective on things.

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