What is the difference between "No Child Left Behind ACT" & "No Child Left Behind ARTICLE?"

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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I have searched far and wide and can find no reference to anything but the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This is, of course, legislature that was co-written by several politicians, including the late Senator Ted Kennedy, signed into law under the "second" Bush Administration. It was meant to guarantee an equal and superior education for all students.

It has supporters and detractors: educators find it difficult to meet the standards all all children are not "equal" under this act—some struggle, some don't care. And with all the testing done year-round, it not only wears kids out, but a great deal of core content material in the classroom is overlooked or rushed through. However, the underprivileged and urban school settings may not be able to guarantee an equal education for all because of financial issues, poor attendance, etc., and supporters look to the legislation to help those who seem to fall through the cracks. The current administration is looking at improving the program.

In terms of the "article," I can only suggest two things. Is your professor referring to a group of printed articles somewhere? Or...could it refer to the sections listed under the major guidelines?

For example, one sources lists the major concerns of the act: annual testing, academic progress, report cards, teacher qualifications, reading first, and funding changes.

At the government site that lists the full text of the act (link documented below), there is an introductory segment with sections; the first major category is

Title I: Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged.

  • Under this heading there are five sections:
  • Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged,
  • Statement of Purpose,
  • Authorization of Appropriations,
  • School Improvement, and
  • State Administration.

Next: Part A—Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies, followed by...

Subpart 1, which has twelve different sections, and it goes on.

Perhaps the articles refer to the sections and subsections of the NCLB Act?

I hope this is of some help.

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