What is the difference between the House of Commons and the House of Lords?

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The House of Commons is made up of 650 elected members of Parliament, while the House of Lords is composed of 800 ladies and gentlemen from various professions. Although both Houses can come up with new laws and pass them for approval, the House of Commons holds the most power when it comes making budget decisions. The Commons can create a new tax law to supplement the government's financial needs and pass it to the House of Lords for debate. Despite following due procedure, the House of Lords cannot change or block those tax decisions. In most instances, the House of Commons will support government decisions since they are part of it. However, the House of Lords is independent and can therefore carefully scrutinize the ruling party for poor decision-making.

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The major difference between the House of Commons and the House of Lords (I assume that you are talking about the Parliament of the United Kingdom) is that the House of Commons is a democratic body whereas the House of Lords is sort of a holdover from the days when Britain was less democratic.

The House of Commons is elected by popular vote of all Britons over the age of 18.  The House of Lords is not elected in any manner whatsoever.  It is made up of people who are either A) senior bishops of the Church of England or B) "peers" or nobility who are selected by the monarch.

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