What did Wilson say were the aims of the war and how do those compare with why the US really entered the war?

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Wilson stated that the United States entered the war to make the world safe for democracy. Wilson did not want the United States listed as an ally but as an associated power, meaning that the United States had higher motives rather than territorial expansion. He claimed that by having these...

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Wilson stated that the United States entered the war to make the world safe for democracy. Wilson did not want the United States listed as an ally but as an associated power, meaning that the United States had higher motives rather than territorial expansion. He claimed that by having these higher motives the United States could provide an example to the warring nations of Europe.

The United States went to war in 1917 in order to punish Germany for its use of unrestricted submarine warfare and the Zimmerman note, a proposed German-Mexican agreement which would possibly lead to another Mexican War. The United States went to war in 1917 to defend its right to trade with whomever it wished. The United States also went to war in order to assist the Entente nations who were dependent on American loans to continue the war. If the Entente lost the war, then they would not be able to repay American financiers. The United States claimed high principles for joining WWI, but money played a key role in the decision to join the conflict.

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