What did Voltaire think about education and child rearing?

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Voltaire was a universal critic. A reader with a thorough understanding of the historical context of Candide would be hard pressed to find an institution, a philosophy, or a political movement that Voltaire wasn't making fun of in it.

The story begins with the youth of Candide, and so we see from the beginning what Voltaire sees as wrong with the bringing up of the young. Candide's teacher, Pangloss, is modeled after the famous philosopher Leibniz, who espoused an extreme optimism, as expressed in the phrase repeated often in the book, "the best of all possible worlds." Candide is a hopelessly naive character, largely because the philosophy of his teacher is hopelessly naive. The focus could have easily been otherwise, but the message would have been the same: a teacher who sees the world incorrectly will corrupt his pupils with an incorrect understanding.

Other problems with Pangloss as a teacher serve as supplement to this issue, such as the humorous incident in which Cunegonde sees...

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