What did Prospero do with his magical books and wand?

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Most of the magic that is referenced in Shakespeare's The Tempest is good magic, or "white magic," which is ultimately used to promote good rather than to harm. Prospero, the Duke of Milan, uses magic throughout the play. He uses magical books and a wand to employ his powers.

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Most of the magic that is referenced in Shakespeare's The Tempest is good magic, or "white magic," which is ultimately used to promote good rather than to harm. Prospero, the Duke of Milan, uses magic throughout the play. He uses magical books and a wand to employ his powers.

In act V, scene I, Prospero and Ariel enter; Duke Prospero is wearing his magic robes. Prospero tells Ariel that everything is going according to plan. Ariel explains that all of the people affected by Prospero's magic are very upset and in great turmoil:

"They cannot budge till your release. The king,
His brother, and yours, abide all three distracted,
And the remainder mourning over them,
Brimful of sorrow and dismay . . .
Your charm so strongly works 'em
That if you now beheld them,
your affections would become tender" (lines 11–18).

Prospero responds that he will soon take pity on the people he's used magic on, even though they committed many wrongs. He will still show them mercy; he will stop the spells he cast on them:

"Go release them Ariel.
My charms I'll break, their senses I'll restore,
And they shall be themselves" (lines 31–33).

After he tells Ariel that he will end his magic, he explains his future plans for his staff and books:

"I'll break my staff,
Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,
And deeper than did ever plummet sound
I'll drown my book" (lines 56–59).

Prospero plans to break his staff and bury it underground. He plans to send his books (of magic spells) to the deepest depths of the ocean. Prospero no longer plans to make use of these magical tools.

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