What did Paul Revere shout on his midnight ride in 1775?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

On the night of April 18, 1775, Paul Revere rode out for Lexington and Concord to spread the word that British soldiers were on the move. Contrary to the popular telling of the night's events, he did not shout "The British are coming." That would have been nonsensical. This event...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

On the night of April 18, 1775, Paul Revere rode out for Lexington and Concord to spread the word that British soldiers were on the move. Contrary to the popular telling of the night's events, he did not shout "The British are coming." That would have been nonsensical. This event took place at the very outset of the American Revolution. Most colonists still considered themselves to be British at the time. Rather, Revere would have referred to the British soldiers as "regulars."

In fact, it is very unlikely that Paul Revere shouted anything that night. There were British spies and patrols throughout the countryside and Revere went to lengths to avoid being detected. Instead of shouting, he rode directly to homes and inns where militia leaders could be found and told them the news directly and likely in a low voice. Despite his efforts to travel as discreetly as possible, Revere was still intercepted by British vedettes and briefly detained.

Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on