What did Oliver receive when he asked for more gruel in Oliver Twist?

In Oliver Twist, when Oliver asks the master who's in charge of serving the food for more gruel, the master hits him on the head with a ladle. Mr. Bumble, the parish beadle, is then informed of Oliver's behavior, and the Board of Directors decides to sell the boy for five pounds.

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In Charles Dickens's novel Oliver Twist, the title character is a nine-year-old boy who lives in a workhouse. He and the other children at the workhouse are given very little to eat. Each of the boys are fed thin gruel three times a day, one onion two times a week, and half of a roll every Sunday. Needless to say, the boys are starving and malnourished.

As the children's hunger becomes unbearable, one of the boys says that he is afraid that he will eat one of his companions if he is not given more food. The children draw straws to decide which unlucky boy will be tasked with asking the master for more food. Oliver draws the shortest straw.

That evening, after dinner, Oliver approaches the master and says, "Please, sir, I want some more." The master is shocked and angered by Oliver's request. He hits the young boy on the head with a ladle and holds him by the arm while calling for the beadle.

The beadle informs the board of Oliver's request, and they are all aghast. Mr. Limbkins says that Oliver will be hung. Oliver is immediately confined, and the next morning, a flyer is posted to the gate outside, offering Oliver and a five-pound reward to anyone willing to take the boy.

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The boys that work with Oliver in the workhouse are starving, as they're only served small portions of gruel (a type of porridge similar to oatmeal) three times a day. They're afraid to ask for more than they're given, but they know that they must try or they'll die of starvation. Thus, they decide to finally ask the master for more gruel; they draw straws to see who will be the one to do it, and nine-year-old Oliver draws the short straw. He knows that asking for more food will get him in a lot of trouble, but he has to do it because the other boys will bully him if he doesn't, and he's also very hungry.

When he approaches the master and asks for a bit more gruel for him and the boys, the master is so shocked and even offended that Oliver dared to ask such a question that he smacks the boy across the head with a big ladle. The master then calls Mr. Bumble, his superior, and tells him about Oliver's "preposterous" request. Mr. Bumble is equally shocked and takes the boy to a room where the Board of Directors are having a meeting. He tells Mr. Limbkins, the chairman, about the incident and Mr. Limbkins, and the directors agree that Oliver will receive a big punishment for his behavior; they even believe that he might be hanged. Thus, they try to think of ways of how to get rid of him and decide to sell Oliver for five pounds to anyone who is willing to take the boy.

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Life in the workhouse is hard enough for the adults, but for the children, it's even worse. Poor waifs like Oliver Twist are forced to undertake mind-numbing, back-breaking toil for hours on end each day. To make matters worse, they're fed on a diet of thin gruel: tasteless slop served up in a tiny bowl. This keeps the children in a state of permanent hunger, so it's not surprising that the other boys are desperate for more food, even if it is just gruel.

So one day, they draw lots to decide who's going to be step forward and ask for more. Oliver is unfortunate enough to draw the short straw, and so at dinner that evening, he nervously approaches the master who's serving the gruel to ask the question for which he's become famous. The response of the master is one of utter shock and incredulity. The boy wants some more? This is almost unheard of within the confines of the workhouse. The master is so outraged at what he perceives as a display of ingratitude that he whacks poor young Oliver on the head with a ladle, holds him by the arm, and immediately calls for the beadle. Oliver's days at the workhouse are numbered.

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Oliver and the other boys draw straws to see who will ask for more gruel. They are all starving and not given enough food. So, of course, Oliver draws the short straw and is forced to ask for more. Unfortunately, this does not go over well with the men in charge. They are almost flabbergasted that the young boy would ask such a thing. However, remember that the boys were only given a very small amount of gruel after working at the workhouse all day. Oliver's request for more is followed by a hit with a spoon by the server. Mr. Bumble is then notified of the request, and it is decided that Oliver will be sold for five pounds to anyone who will take him. There is also a threat of Oliver being hanged.

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