Why did the Mission System decline after Mexico got its independence from Spain?

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Spain was the power in the New World for 300 years, controlling South and Central America and the western half of North America. With immense resources, Spanish influence continued to spread northward, until it rubbed against the Russians in the Pacific Northwest.  The Russians, in turn , were pushing down...

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Spain was the power in the New World for 300 years, controlling South and Central America and the western half of North America. With immense resources, Spanish influence continued to spread northward, until it rubbed against the Russians in the Pacific Northwest.  The Russians, in turn , were pushing down the West Coast.  Spain started building the missions in the mid 1700's to contain this Russian expansion, and spread its authority politically and religiously.  Surprisingly, Spain was conquered by Napoleon in the early 1800's; with trouble in the Mother Country the Spanish colonies in the New World, inspiried by the American Revolution, followed their English counterparts on the East Coast and revolted, among which was Mexico.  But Mexico wasn't Spain, and it hadn't the resources to maintain the Missions, and the system began to decay, and then collapse.  By 1834 Mexico gave away the missionary lands to the descendants of those first Spanish settlers.

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