What did Daniel have to promise in The Bronze Bow?

In The Bronze Bow, Daniel had to promise his father that he would continue to fight against the Romans in response to their cruelty against the Jewish people, even if it meant dying for the cause.

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After Daniel's father was brutally executed by the Romans, Daniel made a solemn vow. Though only eight years old at the time, he promised that he would pay back the Romans for what they'd done and with his whole life, too. From that day on, he vowed to hate them,...

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After Daniel's father was brutally executed by the Romans, Daniel made a solemn vow. Though only eight years old at the time, he promised that he would pay back the Romans for what they'd done and with his whole life, too. From that day on, he vowed to hate them, fight them, and kill them.

It says a lot about the political situation in ancient Israel that a mere child should feel obliged to make such a blood-curdling oath, but Daniel is just one of many children who've taken this extraordinary step.

The Roman authorities seem neither to know nor care that meting out cruel treatment to the Jewish people will encourage a new generation of young men to join the Zealot cause and commit themselves to driving the Romans out of Israel once and for all, yet that's precisely what's happened in the case of Daniel. His father's execution has turned him into an implacable, lifelong foe of the Romans.

For most of the story Daniel remains completely faithful to his oath, but it's a sign of how remarkable his subsequent transformation is that he's able to abandon the path of violent vengeance and embrace the peaceful, loving message of Jesus Christ.

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